Connect with us

Health

12 Fall Superfoods to Put on Your Grocery List

Published

on

[ad_1]

Apples — Apples ranked second behind bananas in 2017 as the fruit most frequently eaten by Americans,1 perhaps due to the adage “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” While you’ll want to keep a close eye on your total daily fructose intake, and most certainly avoid an all-fruit diet, eating whole fruit like apples can be beneficial to your health.

Research suggests apples are a great source of antioxidant and anticancer phytochemicals, most of which reside in the skin.2,3 Apples are also prized for their ability to promote healthy digestion, with one medium apple boasting about 4.4 grams (g) of fiber. 

To ensure you receive the best of the flavanoids and polyphenols apples have to offer, you’ll want to eat the whole fruit, including the skin. Because apples are one of the most pesticide-contaminated foods, you’ll want to buy organic. However, the apple peel is far more concentrated than the flesh.

If you live near an organic apple orchard, you may enjoy picking your own. Want a healthy spin on an old favorite way to use apples? Try my “Health-Boosting Apple Crumble Recipe.” Remember, apples contain fructose so eat them in moderation.


Beets and beet greens — Beetroot contains high amounts of fiber and infection-fighting vitamin C, as well as nutrients that help you detoxify, fight inflammation and lower your blood pressure.4 As a source of healthy nitrates, the consumption of beets boosts your nitric oxide levels.

Beetroot may also help combat cancer, particularly cancers of the breast and prostate.5 I include about 1 to 2 ounces of raw beets in my daily smoothie and also take a powdered fermented beetroot supplement. Due to beets’ high sugar content, raw beet juice may not be a healthy choice for you, especially if you have diabetes or are insulin resistant.

If you routinely discard beet greens, you should know they are an excellent source of vitamins A and K, as well as calcium and potassium.6 Beet greens are quite tasty steamed or you can sauté them with a little raw grass fed butter and salt. Check out the video above for six more reasons you should eat beets.


Brussels sprouts — Brussels sprouts are some of the hardiest members of the cabbage family and a touch of frost brings out their sweetness, making them an ideal fall food. One cup of cooked Brussels sprouts contains nearly all of your recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamins C and K1.7

They’re also a good source of vitamin B6, choline, fiber, manganese and potassium. A 2009 study published in Food Chemistry highlighted the chemopreventive properties of cruciferous vegetables such as Brussels sprouts, kale and broccoli.

The study authors noted these vegetables were “found to possess very potent inhibitory activities against all tested [cancer] cell lines. These properties are in agreement with the known anticancer properties of these vegetables observed in both epidemiological and laboratory studies.”8


Cauliflower — Cauliflower contains an impressive array of nutrients, including vitamin B6, fiber, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and potassium. It also is packed with natural antioxidants, such as beta-carotene, kaempferol, quercetin, rutin, vitamin C and others, which defend against free radical damage.

Cauliflower contains the cancer-fighting compounds sulforaphane and isothiocyanates, the former of which has been shown to kill cancer stem cells responsible for its spread.9,10,11 The sulforaphane found in cauliflower may also help improve your blood pressure and kidney function.12 View the video above to discover more of the health benefits associated with cauliflower.

Two ways you can enjoy cauliflower as a comfort food include steaming and mashing it to make “caulitators,” a healthier substitute for traditional mashed potatoes, and using it to create a mouth-watering cauliflower pizza casserole or cauliflower pizza crust.


Daikon radish — According to The Japan Times,13 daikon radish is considered Japan’s most popular vegetable, with its white roots and green tops eaten year-round in various forms: cooked, dried, pickled, raw and sprouted. Radishes have been part of Japanese cuisine for millennia and 90 percent of daikon radishes are grown and consumed in that country.14

Raw grated daikon (known as daikon oroshi) has a taste less pungent than, but similar to, horseradish. This ubiquitous Japanese condiment is served with many meat and fish dishes, and is also added to sauces for soba noodles and tempura. Particularly during the winter months, dried daikon and pickled daikon are important staples of the Japanese diet.

Some mix daikon oroshi with plain yogurt and honey to make a concoction that is believed to promote regularity. Similar to beets, don’t throw away radish greens; they’re edible. About daikon greens, the University of Illinois Extension said:15

“Daikon greens are delicious too. They can be washed, stacked, rolled into a scroll and cut crosswise. This produces thin julienne strips which are traditionally salted and left standing for an hour. The moisture is squeezed out. The leaves are then chopped and stored in glass jars for up to a week in the refrigerator. The Japanese stir them into warm rice, [and] they can also be added to soups and other recipes.”


Kale — Kale is a powerhouse vegetable loaded with antioxidants, calcium, fiber and vitamins A, C and K. The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin found in kale help protect your eyes against macular degeneration.

A 1-cup serving of this healthy green contains significant amounts of vitamin C and about half as much calcium as a cup of milk.16,17 It also provides plant-based omega-3 fatty acids and 18 amino acids. Kale’s anti-inflammatory properties are said to help prevent arthritis, autoimmune diseases and heart disease.

Studies suggest kale can help reduce your risk of heart disease because it optimizes your cholesterol, including raising your high density lipoprotein (HDL).18 The presence of cancer-fighting sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol are other reasons to eat kale.

If you like variety, you’ll love kale because it is available in curly, dinosaur, Russian and ornamental varieties, each with a slightly different taste and texture. Looking for a new way to prepare kale? Check out my article “9 Healthy Kale Recipes.”


Kumquats — This tiny yellow-orange fruit, which resembles a small oval orange, boasts a sweet-yet-tangy flavor and a hint of bitterness. What sets kumquats apart from other citrus fruits is the fact its skin and zest are sweet and can be eaten.

Kumquats are a low-calorie fruit, with 100 g of fresh kumquats containing just 71 calories.19 This fruit is rich in antioxidant vitamins A, C and E and contains flavonoid antioxidants such as lutein and zeaxanthin. While kumquats are delicious when eaten whole, they do contain fructose so I suggest you eat them only occasionally.

Kumquats can also be incorporated into fruit salads or used as a glaze for duck and other fatty meats. They are a fine addition to poultry stuffing and can also be used as a dessert topping.


Pomegranates — While popularized in the U.S. in juice form, I recommend you consume pomegranates as a whole fruit. Even though it takes concentrated effort to extract the 600 or so juice-filled seed sacs (called arils) found in the average pomegranate, you’ll be rewarded with not only a wonderful tart flavor, but also a number of health benefits.

But, just like apples, the bulk of the polyphenols and phtyochemical benefits are stacked away in the peel that is relatively bitter. But it can be dried and powdered and put into capsules and taken as a supplement.

Research has shown eating pomegranates may protect you against Alzheimer’s disease and certain cancers, increase blood flow to your heart, soothe inflammation associated with osteoarthritis and help maintain your blood pressure and cholesterol balance.20  If you toss a half cup of pomegranate seeds into a salad, you’ll receive a slew of antioxidants and 4 g of fiber, as well as a decent amount of calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamin C.21

A 100 g serving (about one-half cup) of pomegranates contains roughly 7 g of fructose.22 When adding pomegranates to your diet, keep in mind that I recommend limiting your daily fructose intake to 25 milligrams (mg) or less if you are healthy and less than 15 mg if you are dealing with a chronic illness.


Pumpkins — Pumpkins are among the most quintessential fall produce. While they are artfully carved in celebration of Halloween, pumpkins also feature prominently on Thanksgiving tables as decorations and, of course, in the form of pumpkin pie. View the video above for a summary of the health benefits associated with pumpkins.

Beyond decorations and pie, pumpkin is useful for its seeds. Pumpkin seeds are a convenient source of magnesium, plant-based omega-3 fats and zinc. To obtain the healthy omega-3 fats, you must eat pumpkin seeds raw.

If you prefer to eat the seeds roasted, do so yourself as a means of controlling the roasting temperature and time. For best results, sprinkle raw pumpkin seeds with pink Himalayan salt and roast them at no more than 170 degrees F (75 degrees Celsius) for 15 to 20 minutes. Store roasted pumpkin seeds in an airtight container.


Squash — With names like acorn, banana, butternut, delicata, kabocha and spaghetti, along with various crook-necked varieties, squash abounds in fall. The creamy, luscious texture of butternut squash, for example, along with its distinctive aroma and flavor provide just a hint of sweetness that enlivens fall soups and stews.

A popular way to prepare butternut squash, which is high in vitamins A and C, as well as folate and potassium,23 is to simply bake or steam it in chunks or halves. Although it needs no enhancement, you may enjoy squash with a pat of grass fed butter and a dash of salt. Alternately, to accent its natural sweetness, you can top it with honey and cinnamon to give it a dessert-like presentation.

Given the starchy nature of most squash varieties, you’ll want to eat this fall crop in moderation, however. If you eat the skin, which is nutrient rich, you should opt for organic varieties. Squash stores well and some varieties will last for several months when maintained in a cool, dark place.


Swiss chard — While not as popular as kale, Swiss chard packs many of the same nutritional benefits, such as high amounts of vitamins A (as beta-carotene), C and K.24 The vibrant array of colors associated with Swiss chard signal the presence of phytonutrients that are prized for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Among them is kaempferol, the flavonoid regarded for its cardioprotective properties, and syringic acid, which is known to help regulate your blood sugar. Similar to beets, Swiss chard provides betalain pigments,25 which have been shown to support your body’s Phase 2 detoxification process involving glutathione,26 the “master antioxidant.”

One cup of cooked Swiss chard provides healthy amounts of calcium and potassium, as well as well as 3.7 g of digestion-boosting fiber.27 If you are prone to kidney stones, keep in mind Swiss chard is high in oxalates, which are naturally-occurring substances that can become problematic if they overaccumulate inside your body, namely in your kidneys.28

Enjoy Swiss chard in salads, smoothies or vegetable juice, or lightly steamed or sautéed as you would other leafy greens like spinach. Like all vegetables, it’s healthier when eaten organically.


Turnips and turnip greens — Turnip taproots and their greens, which are somewhat bitter, are both edible and nutritious. Turnip taproots are a hearty addition to soups and stews, have a mild flavor and bring forth a potato-like texture when cooked.

You can steam turnip greens to reduce their bitterness or toss them with a citrus vinaigrette dressing to balance out the sharp taste. Cook turnips in a manner that allows them to retain some of their characteristic crunch.

As noted in the video above, turnips are rich in antioxidants and beneficial nutrients such as vitamins A (in the form of beta-carotene), C, E and K — found in the leafy green tops — as well as calcium, copper, iron, manganese and potassium. If you’d like to combine turnips with a healthy fat, you might enjoy my “Savory Roasted Turnip with Coconut Oil Recipe.”


[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Health

Post-vaccine surge? Michigan’s spring coronavirus case spike close to previous year’s autumn high

Published

on

By

(Natural News) The spike in new Wuhan coronavirus infections recorded in Michigan over the spring is similar to a spike seen during the 2020 fall season. According to a Wall Street Journal analysis, the state’s daily coronavirus case count averaged more than 7,000 for almost two weeks – before taking a slight dip to 6,891 on April 20. This echoed similar figures back in November and December 2020, which saw sharp rises in infections for those two months before plunging.

Back in autumn of last year, Michigan averaged more than 7,000 cases per day for a span of 10 days. New infections dropped slightly, then briefly spiked as the December holidays approached. It then fell to the low 1,000s for the succeeding two months – until ascending again in March.

According to University of Michigan internal medicine professor Dr. Vikas Parekh, the sudden increase in new infections could be attributed to several factors. Among the factors he cited was re-openings, which increased people’s interactions and mobility. Parekh said the loosened restrictions contributed to the spread of the highly contagious U.K. B117 variant.

“As the B117 variant spreads nationally, we will likely see other stats [with] their own surges – although I hope none are as bad as Michigan,” the professor remarked. He continued: “The milestone just tells us we are not yet in the clear, especially as we still have large portions of our population who are not vaccinated yet.”

Parekh also expressed optimism over the lower daily caseloads the Great Lakes State reported. He said he believes both cases and hospitalizations have plateaued and will likely decline soon. The professor commented: “[COVID-19] positivity has been declining now for one week, which is usually a leading indicator of case decline.”

Meanwhile, the state cited younger populations and youth sports, such as basketball, wrestling and hockey, to increase new COVID-19 infections. Because of this, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer called to suspend youth sports and indoor dining in the state. She also exhorted high schools to conduct remote class sessions for two weeks to curb the spread of the pathogen.

Michigan still experienced the spike in cases despite having one of the highest vaccination rates in the country

During the opening stages of the U.S.’s immunization drive against COVID-19, Michigan boasted of having one of the highest vaccination rates nationwide. A report by Bridge Michigan even noted the initial “frenzy for vaccines” that “far exceeded the state’s limited supply.” But things have appeared to turn around for Michigan, as it now struggles to reach the 70 percent vaccination rate needed for herd immunity.

Continue Reading

Health

Scottish mom’s legs turn into a pair of “giant blisters” after first dose of AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine

Published

on

By

(Natural News) Sarah Beuckmann of Glasgow, Scotland, felt a tingling sensation in her legs and noticed a rash flaring up around her ankles a week after getting her first dose of AstraZeneca’s coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine on March 18.

She also had flu-like symptoms right after the vaccination.

Beuckmann called her doctor to arrange an appointment the morning she noticed the rash, but by the afternoon her skin was already breaking out into blood-filled blisters. Blisters also appeared on her legs, hands, face, arms and bottom.

“I ended up asking my husband to take me to A&E,” said Beuckmann, referring to “accident and emergency,” the equivalent of an emergency room (ER). “When I got there, my heart rate was sitting at 160bpm, which they were very concerned about. I got put on an ECG machine.”

Doctors determine AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine triggers the rash

Medics carried out tests for HIV, herpes and other skin conditions to work out what triggered the rash, but all results came back negative. Doctors finally determined that the vaccine caused her rare reaction after carrying out two biopsies.

“Once they found that it was a reaction to the vaccine, they put me on steroids and that really seems to be helping my progress,” said Beuckmann. She had been advised by her doctor not to get the second dose of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine because of her reaction.

Beuckmann spent 16 days at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. She was discharged to recover at home. The 34-year-old mother of one is currently wheelchair-bound due to the bandages on her legs and blisters on the soles of her feet. She may need physiotherapy to help strengthen her leg muscles.

“They are starting to heal and they’re looking a lot better than they were but as the blisters started to get worse, they all sort of merged together,” she said. “I didn’t know what was going on.”

With the blisters merging, her legs have looked like a pair of “giant blisters.” Beuckmann admitted that at one point she feared her legs might have to be amputated.

Dermatologist agrees COVID-19 vaccine causes the blisters

Dr. Emma Wedgeworth, a consultant dermatologist and spokeswoman at the British Skin Foundation, agreed that Beuckmann had likely suffered a reaction to the vaccine.

“Vaccines are designed to activate the immune system. Occasionally people will have quite dramatic activation of their immune systems which, as happened in this case, can manifest in their skin” Wedgeworth told MailOnline. “This poor lady had a very severe reaction, which thankfully is extremely rare.”

It is not clear why Beuckmann, who works in retail, was invited for a vaccine. Scotland’s vaccine rollout was focused on people over the age of 50 when she got vaccinated, although vaccines are available to those who are considered at risk from the virus, or live with someone considered vulnerable.

At least 20 million Briton have had AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine, which drug regulators say causes a rash in one percent of cases. They say rashes caused by the jab tend to go away within a week.

Continue Reading

Health

Trojan labs? Chinese biotech company offers to build COVID testing labs in six states

Published

on

By

In 2012, BGI acquired Complete Genomics, a DNA sequencing company and equipment maker. The funds for the $117.6 million purchase were raised from Chinese venture capitals. The company has expanded its footprint globally. According to its website, BGI conducts business in more than 100 countries and areas and has 11 offices and labs in the U.S.

People are concerned about China’s access to American DNA data

Some said that with Complete Genomics providing an American base, BGI would have access to more DNA samples from Americans, helping it compile a huge database of genetic information. Some also worried about the protection of the genetic information’s privacy.

According to a 2019 report from the U.S.–China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC), BGI “has formed numerous partnerships with U.S. healthcare providers and research organizations to provide large-scale genetic sequencing to support medical research efforts,”

There are three main reasons why many people in the biotech community and government have expressed concerns about China’s access to American DNA data.

In the “60 Minutes” interview, Evanina discussed the very likely scenario in which Chinese companies would be able to micro-target American individuals and offer customized preventative solutions based on their DNA.

Evanina asked: “Do we want to have another nation systematically eliminate our healthcare services? Are we okay with that as a nation?”

The second concern is that China may use DNA to track and attack American individuals. As the USCC report states: “China could target vulnerabilities in specific individuals brought to light by genomic data or health records. Individuals targeted in such attacks would likely be strategically identified persons, such as diplomats, politicians, high-ranking federal officials or military leadership.”

The third concern is that China may devise bioweapons to target non-Asians. Steven Mosher, president of the Population Research Institute, discussed it in his article “What Will China Do With Your DNA?” published by The Epoch Times in March 2019.

He wrote: “We know that the Asian genome is genetically distinct from the Caucasian and African in many ways. … Would it be possible to bioengineer a very virulent version of, say, smallpox, that was easily transmitted, fatal to other races, but to which the Chinese enjoyed a natural immunity? … Given our present ability to manipulate genomes, if such a bio-weapon can be imagined, it can probably – given enough time and resources – be realized.”

An article from Technocracy said: “China’s aggressive collection of American DNA should be doubly alarming because it can only spell one ultimate outcome: biowarfare. That is, genetically engineering viruses or other diseases that will be selectively harmful to U.S. populations.”

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending